How to Reveal a Fake Facebook Account


Facebook has put together a social network of over a billion people. Someof those people do not have the best interests of their fellow humans at heart. They may seek you out to get information, to steal your identity, or even to destroy your reputation. How do you guard against predators like that? We'll show you a few ways to protect your self and your family on Facebook. Read on!





Steps

1
Know why it is important to spot a fake account. First and foremost, somebody with a fake account is—almost by definition—a con artist. Unless you run with that crowd, you probably don't want them in your life.
While they may present themselves as a friend, or even a romantic interest, their sole purpose in friending you may be as harmless as a mind game, or they may be after much more, such as your money, goods and property.
The impostor might also be setting you up to steal your identity or valuable information from you that they can use to manipulate someone else.



2
Don't talk to strangers. At the least, think twice about accepting friend requests from people you don't know and who are not connected to you through legitimate, verifiable means. If you're not sure, do the following:
Ask them questions: What makes you want to be your friend? How did they find out about you? Who do you know in common? By clicking on their name, you can see if you have any mutual friends. If you do, contact your friend. If not—that's a big red flag.


3
Do a little detective work. At the very least, it can be fun. You might also find out that your would-be "friend" is really bad news. Here are some things to sleuth out:


4
Read the profile carefully. Does what is being said add up or are there some really hard-to-believe statements being made?
For example, maybe there is a photo of a very young person next to claims of being a professor or a CEO. Does the embellishment seem more than the usual "making oneself look good" and come across as simply implausible? Trust your own senses on this one. You could even ask for proof of some of the things the person has stated—they're approaching you, after all. You have every right to make sure they're legitimate.


5
Check out their profile picture. Is there only one? Is it way too perfect or does it seem touched up in any way? Maybe you've seen it before? A good photo — or a touched up one — may not be a negative sign, but it could be that they've simple scoured Google for an attractive photo, thinking nobody would ever find out. Try this:
Click and drag their profile picture to your desktop.

Launch Google Chrome or Firefox, and navigate to Google Images.

Drag and drop the profile pic into the search field: it will expand, as shown:

Google will either return an exact match (with information like names), or pictures similar to the original.




6
Search their name online to see if it returns. This won't be so useful if the name is a common one, but for a more unusual one there might be some interesting returns.
If they have a common name, add other information such as their location, approximate age, or any other information you can glean from their profile.
Have they been tagged? A real person is generally tagged here and there as part of the Facebook sharing experience.


7
Check out their friends. Are their friends global or local? The more local the friends, the more likely the person is to be real. The more global their friendship list, with very few or no local friends, start getting suspicious.
The lack of local friends suggests that this is not a real person you're dealing with but a fake account. This is often used by people pretending to be attractive young women. They will often contact you with a line like "I saw your picture and you looked nice."


8
Block the request. If you don't have a good feeling about somebody, there's a simple solution: don't just turn down the request for friendship, block them completely.
Click on their Facebook name, and go to their Timeline. On the right, under the Cover Photo, click on the Message settings:
You can block them from contacting you, or report them to Facebook if you feel they are a threat or involved in illicit or illegal activities.


9
Create a "probationary period." If you're in the (not-so-great) habit of accepting friend requests from friends of friends' friends, or friend people because they seem to have similar tastes to yours in music, cooking, dancing, or whatever, then you leave yourself open to the occasional fake.
While you can make wonderful connections in this way, try to always have someone you do know vouch for this person first. And if that's not possible, be alert to signs of weird behavior, such as suddenly bombarding you with likes, comments, photos, etc. on a daily basis.
If you hardly know this person, they should be taking things slowly and politely, not invading your space immediately.
If, after a week or two, you're not comfortable with your new friend, unfriend them!


10
Beware interconnected faking. At one time it was probably reasonable to think that if someone had a group of friends interacting with them and vouching for each other, that that person must be real. Not anymore!
There are increasing cases of one person running numerous fake Facebook accounts, pretending to be an array of different people, all vouching for one another and all trying to be friends with someone real!
An excellent example is the case of Natalia Burgess, who wove a web of deceit and caused many young males to fall for her various aliases — all because she felt inadequately loved.[1] Sadly, impostors of this sort go to incredible lengths to create an array of fake accounts including other social media accounts and websites to give the impression that their fake personas are "real".


11
Look for and record inconsistencies. If you're being targeted by an elaborate web of lies, eventually these start to unravel. This is most evident in someone who is trying to maintain several fake Facebook accounts at once and eventually, they will drop the ball and mix up their stories.
If you start noticing this in response to questions, or in their comments, take note and remain alert for more inconsistencies.


12
Do a double take if the person says anything weird or "out-of-character". For example: if an adult is pretending to be a teen, they may say something that dates them by referring to a historic event or person that teens wouldn't really know much about. Or they may prove to know way too much about a topic that someone they're claiming to be would not.
Take note of what the suspicious person says, as everyone slips up! No one is perfect, and they're bound to eventually say something that will give you a hint that your hunch is correct.


13
Be really wary of undying declarations of love, affection, and romance. If someone you've never met, who lives thousands of miles away from you, and who has barely revealed themselves gets amorous with you, be suspicious. Sometimes the faker does this because they love the feeling of playing with the life and feelings of someone else; sometimes it's because they're in love with online love but are too afraid to reveal their true selves (or they're in a relationship in real life); and other times it could be that they're after something, like money, sex, or drugs.
Question your own feelings and motivations if you start to feel something for a person who declares they love you online. Is it too sudden? Too weird? Too freaky? A little bit icky? Trust those feelings and delete this fake friend from your account.
If they ask you for sexy pictures, immediately be suspicious. A fake account is a good shill for getting free pornographic material that then gets passed around online.


14
Unfriend them! If you're suspicious, unsure, or uncomfortable with having them as part of your Facebook friends, pull the plug. It's not like they're your real friends or family, and they could cause you a lot of future problems.
Warn other friends of yours on Facebook if you know they have also friended the fake account; one of the tactics of an impostor is to befriend others in your circle of friends to try to make the friendship seem more "real".

over the past few weeks ive had multiple amounts of fake accounts try to add me (4 today alone), ive just found out that many of my friends on facebook have this same issue. ive checked out some of the accounts that have sent me friends requests and some of them are less than 2 hour's old, i think its getting a joke now and im sick of having to report these accounts.
i want to know what facebook is doing about there breach in security because its obviously a program someone is using, my brother said him and 6 of his friends who were in the same room all got the same friend request off the same person at the same time. so to me this is an obvious breach in there security and it needs to be sorted, ive looked at ways to try and contact facebook directly but alas this is there only way of doing it and from some of the posts ive read facebook doesnt seem to reply to any of them.
so this is more of a WARNING to anyone who receives a friend request from someone they dont know, please please please be so very careful when this happens because we dont know what these programs are capable of. make sure you check there profile out before you add them, and if your unsure of who they are and whether or not its a fake account just send them a message asking who they are and how they know you and then delete there friend request.
If you were to look at a group of 10 recent likes on a news post, chances are that one of those users is fake. Facebook reportedly has around 170 million fake users, and possibly many more that they aren’t quite aware of yet.
Why is this such an issue, and what has Facebook been doing about it? Let’s dig in.
Why create fake profiles
It’s an unfortunate (but undeniable) truth that a price can be put on a Facebook fan, regardless of the quality.
Fake Facebook fans are sold by the thousands on sites that promise a quick delivery time, and some even boldly claim that the fans are real people. Buying and selling Facebook fans is a multi-million dollar industry, and when a clever piece of software can automate the creation of profiles, you might as well be printing cash.
Imagine a software that you set up, click “go,” and then get paid by people to have likes built for their fan page in seconds. Zero overhead and pure profit. You get the point.
The popularity of these programs were almost entirely to blame for explosion of fake fans on Facebook. Marketplaces like Fiverr and SEOClerks sell tens of thousands of likes for anywhere from $5-$25, and these are just a fraction of the accounts that this one particular seller controls.
It’s very difficult for Facebook to stop these programs and these like sellers without affecting ordinary Facebook users. Here’s why.
How fake profiles are created.
This software that creates fake Facebook profiles can be bought for anywhere from $50-200. Some of these programs are illegal in certain countries, and nearly all of them break Facebook’s terms of service, which could get your account permanently deleted from the social network.
Once you own the software, creating profiles is relatively easy.
In order to simulate many different users simultaneously, spammers need to utilize private proxies, which are fresh IP addresses that have not been released yet. If you own 10,000 proxies, you essentially own 10,000 internet identities that can be used to create accounts through software.
Account creation software has many different features to avoid detection; randomization of page load times, proxy rotation, Captcha-cracking logic and scraped profile images (to name a few).
This makes for a very effective account creation bot that is difficult to detect. After a certain point, if you make it too difficult for bots to sign up, it’s going to affect genuine users who just want to use Facebook as it was intended.
What Facebook has been doing about it.
Facebook has been recently “purging” fake accounts that it has discovered, and has released this message to the press:
We’ve recently updated the way we measure how many people like your Page. Pages may see a decrease in likes after March 12 [2015], when we [have] removed likes from inactive Facebook accounts.
After this latest purge, millions of profiles disappeared overnight, and users were prompted with a warning for the first time.

Facebook warned page owners:
Over the coming weeks, Page admins should expect to see a small dip in their number of Page likes as a result of this update. It’s important to remember, though, that these removed likes represent people who were already inactive on Facebook.
In previous Facebook and Instagram “purges”, celebrities like Justin Beiber were hit the hardest; at one point, he lost over 3.5 million fans overnight when Facebook axed a large group of accounts.

The issue still persists.
While these accounts were deleted by Facebook, the actual account creation process has not changed very much, if at all. Programs pass updates to the people who have purchased them, and “likes” sellers simply create more accounts at the click of a button.
10 Different Types of Fake Facebook Accounts
April 4, 2014 Jason Pelish 1 Comment
Fake Facebook Accounts are accounts people establish that aren’t representative of them as a real person. Facebook intends for all of its users to practice some sincerity when identifying themselves. They want to know about the “real you” and not have you use their platform for reasons outside what it’s intended for. Contrary to what Facebook asks people to do, many people use Facebook through accounts that aren’t representative of their true identity; for many reasons people create “Fake Accounts.” This article explains some of the reasons why fake accounts are being used and why Facebook does or doesn’t tolerate them in practice.

NOTE: The author of this article in no way recommends anyone using Facebook outside the EULA. Fake Facebook Accounts are outside the EULA and use of them can be costly.
Here are the Ten Types of Fake Facebook Accounts:
Ten Types of Fake Facebook Accounts:
Spambots
Certain accounts are established with the purpose of spamming Facebook Groups with ads. The links on their Profile usually give them away. They promote certain things for sale; usually the same thing over and over. These accounts typically have no Friends, but if they do they are other bots. If you see an account that looks like a spambot it could be a real person who is simply using Facebook for business purposes. Interacting with them is the best way to determine if this kind of account is real or not. Spambots will rarely answer back or engage with actual users.
Likebots
These are the types of accounts I have talked about before. They exist mainly just to Like things. They’ll Like Pages, and sometimes Posts too. Often their Likes can be purchased, other times they’re part of a more restricted pool of bots promoting brands or celebrities. These accounts infrequently post but Like a wide number of disconnected things. Clicking on Like Ads is one thing that these bots do, which makes they very annoying. Using advanced targeting is the way to avoid them from clicking on your ads.
Stalkers
Facebook has a feature that lets one user Block another user, making the two invisible to one another. They can’t see each other’s Posts or Comments, even if they have shared Friends. What happens when an ex-spouse or ex-boyfriend/ex-girlfriend wants spy on their ex, but can’t because they’re blocked? They set up fake accounts to spy, a.k.a “stalk”, their ex. These Stalker Profiles rarely make trouble or interact outside what they’re intended for, stalking a single individual or their Friends. Sometimes if the stalker gets bored with the stalkee, the account may evolve into a troll account to let off the hormonal steam.
Pseudonym Accounts
These aren’t really fake profiles, but rather a real person who isn’t working too hard to conceal their identity except by operating under a different name. These accounts are often established for the purpose of not being searchable on Facebook for professional reasons. If you use Facebook Groups you’ll sometimes find one or two screaming children who get upset about people interacting under false names. Although these types of accounts get reported often because of this type of behavior, Facebook doesn’t do much to enforce its users using their real names.
Unlike most other social media publications, Facebook is really diligent and effective at getting their users to validate their accounts. If a user passes the bar of linking one either their mobile number or a credit card number to their Facebook account, the account is validated and the use of a pseudonym is tolerated.
Work Branded Profiles
These are accounts that aren’t really fake per-se, but since they don’t represent someone’s real name they violate the technical definition of real: using your actual, unaltered name. Profiles like this are usually established for innocent reasons. They have names like “Anthony’s Fifth Avenue Pizza Parlor” or “Rosanna What’s Her Face: Identity Verification Engineer“. Facebook doesn’t care much that people do this. It might actually be beneficial for marketing reasons if you don’t mind looking a little unusual, so I won’t advise against it.
Shared Page Management Accounts & Ad Buying Accounts
These are generally innocuous accounts established by corporate marketers, using an email address at a corporate domain. This is mainly for the purpose of keeping the control of a Facebook Page separate from individual accounts. Lots of businesses have gotten burned by letting employees or vendors use their own accounts for managing Facebook Pages. The marketing department would wake up to find that a disgruntled employee, intending to be on the way out, had taken sole possession of all their hard-earned Facebook Pages. Sometimes it’s out of spite. Other times it’s for financial gain, digital blackmail. Facebook has improved their security model to help prevent this, but many marketing departments err on the side of caution still. Sometimes these accounts can be leveraged for media buying, advertising, and engagement on the page level as well as simply holding on to the page adminship. Many marketers set up these kinds of account for their clients when they need to buy ads on behalf of their clients, but don’t want to use their own personal Profile or ask the client for use of the client’s personal Profile. Facebook obviously wants to make it as easy as possible for advertisers to use their ad real estate, so this isn’t the kind of Fake Profile they’re looking to root out.
Trolls
These are people who are out for some lulz and enjoy engaging on many different levels from friendly to satirical to abusive. Although many of them are plainly sadistic, others are truly humorous and add value to Facebook in a way that’s impossible without anonymity. Trolls will often make their Profile identity purposefully extreme to incite RAGE, but the people they often like to tease the most are people whose views are in line with theirs. Trolls engage a lot in Facebook Groups, or by commenting on posts made by Facebook Pages.
Kids’ Accounts
Kids under 13 aren’t supposed to have Facebook accounts. Many children, however, do have cellphones to validate Facebook Profiles against. This means lots of kids who aren’t old enough to be using Facebook are intentionally making themselves look like adults. It’s pretty clear from looking at their Friends and the nature of their Posts that they’re children. I strongly advise parents to monitor each and every social media account their children are engaging with, and let them know you’re monitoring it. Kids are kids and will do stupid stuff. It will stay with them for their entire lives, and just because dots aren’t connected today with regards to social profile ownership, doesn’t mean that they won’t be connected in the future. Make sure your kids stay off social media without your supervision.
Anonymous Social Activists
Some people have social agendas that they want to enforce via all sorts of media, social media included. It’s common for people with extreme views to hide behind anonymity. This has been true for authors who operated under pen names in the past, and is even more true for social media users today.
Impersonators
The most heinous of Fake Facebook Profiles is an impersonator. These are people who are intentionally using another person’s name to trick other people into believing that they’re that person. Some trolls might find joy in creating chaos that gets attributed to their target, but it can also be part of identity theft. If you find someone operating an account that’s intended to look like you then they should be reported right away. Get ready to validate who you are in the case where the other person contests your report.
Hopefully this article illustrated that there are many different reasons why people use Fake Facebook Accounts. Some are innocent, others have duplicitous intent. Know the difference before you get freaked out on social media and make yourself look foolish by expecting people to use it the same way you do. At the end of the day remember that Facebook is trying to give everyone the best experience possible, and how that plays out in the real world might be different than what YOU expect.
Edit Article
How to Reveal a Fake Facebook Account
Community Q&A
Facebook has put together a social network of over a billion people. Some of those people do not have the best interests of their fellow humans at heart. They may seek you out to get information, to steal your identity, or even to destroy your reputation. How do you guard against predators like that? We'll show you a few ways to protect your self and your family on Facebook. Read on!


Steps
1
Know why it is important to spot a fake account. First and foremost, somebody with a fake account is—almost by definition—a con artist. Unless you run with that crowd, you probably don't want them in your life.
While they may present themselves as a friend, or even a romantic interest, their sole purpose in friending you may be as harmless as a mind game, or they may be after much more, such as your money, goods and property.
The impostor might also be setting you up to steal your identity or valuable information from you that they can use to manipulate someone else.

Image titled Reveal a Fake Facebook Account Step 2Bullet12
Don't talk to strangers. At the least, think twice about accepting friend requests from people you don't know and who are not connected to you through legitimate, verifiable means. If you're not sure, do the following:
Ask them questions: What makes you want to be your friend? How did they find out about you? Who do you know in common? By clicking on their name, you can see if you have any mutual friends. If you do, contact your friend. If not—that's a big red flag.
Image titled Be a Country Singer Step 43
Do a little detective work. At the very least, it can be fun. You might also find out that your would-be "friend" is really bad news. Here are some things to sleuth out:
Image titled Reveal a Fake Facebook Account Step 44
Read the profile carefully. Does what is being said add up or are there some really hard-to-believe statements being made?
For example, maybe there is a photo of a very young person next to claims of being a professor or a CEO. Does the embellishment seem more than the usual "making oneself look good" and come across as simply implausible? Trust your own senses on this one. You could even ask for proof of some of the things the person has stated—they're approaching you, after all. You have every right to make sure they're legitimate.
Image titled Reveal a Fake Facebook Account Step 55
Check out their profile picture. Is there only one? Is it way too perfect or does it seem touched up in any way? Maybe you've seen it before? A good photo — or a touched up one — may not be a negative sign, but it could be that they've simple scoured Google for an attractive photo, thinking nobody would ever find out. Try this:
Click and drag their profile picture to your desktop.
Image titled Reveal a Fake Facebook Account Step 5Bullet1
Launch Google Chrome or Firefox, and navigate to Google Images.
Image titled Reveal a Fake Facebook Account Step 5Bullet2
Drag and drop the profile pic into the search field: it will expand, as shown:
Image titled Reveal a Fake Facebook Account Step 5Bullet3
Google will either return an exact match (with information like names), or pictures similar to the original.
Image titled 5 b4


Image titled 6 496
Search their name online to see if it returns. This won't be so useful if the name is a common one, but for a more unusual one there might be some interesting returns.
If they have a common name, add other information such as their location, approximate age, or any other information you can glean from their profile.
Have they been tagged? A real person is generally tagged here and there as part of the Facebook sharing experience.
Image titled Reveal a Fake Facebook Account Step 77
Check out their friends. Are their friends global or local? The more local the friends, the more likely the person is to be real. The more global their friendship list, with very few or no local friends, start getting suspicious.
The lack of local friends suggests that this is not a real person you're dealing with but a fake account. This is often used by people pretending to be attractive young women. They will often contact you with a line like "I saw your picture and you looked nice."
Image titled Reveal a Fake Facebook Account Step 88
Block the request. If you don't have a good feeling about somebody, there's a simple solution: don't just turn down the request for friendship, block them completely.
Click on their Facebook name, and go to their Timeline. On the right, under the Cover Photo, click on the Message settings:
You can block them from contacting you, or report them to Facebook if you feel they are a threat or involved in illicit or illegal activities.
Image titled Become a Famous Singer when You Don't Think You Sing Well Step 99
Create a "probationary period." If you're in the (not-so-great) habit of accepting friend requests from friends of friends' friends, or friend people because they seem to have similar tastes to yours in music, cooking, dancing, or whatever, then you leave yourself open to the occasional fake.
While you can make wonderful connections in this way, try to always have someone you do know vouch for this person first. And if that's not possible, be alert to signs of weird behavior, such as suddenly bombarding you with likes, comments, photos, etc. on a daily basis.
If you hardly know this person, they should be taking things slowly and politely, not invading your space immediately.
If, after a week or two, you're not comfortable with your new friend, unfriend them!
Image titled Avoid Getting Detentions Step 710
Beware interconnected faking. At one time it was probably reasonable to think that if someone had a group of friends interacting with them and vouching for each other, that that person must be real. Not anymore!
There are increasing cases of one person running numerous fake Facebook accounts, pretending to be an array of different people, all vouching for one another and all trying to be friends with someone real!
An excellent example is the case of Natalia Burgess, who wove a web of deceit and caused many young males to fall for her various aliases — all because she felt inadequately loved.[1] Sadly, impostors of this sort go to incredible lengths to create an array of fake accounts including other social media accounts and websites to give the impression that their fake personas are "real".
Image titled Get Noticed As a Singer Step 411
Look for and record inconsistencies. If you're being targeted by an elaborate web of lies, eventually these start to unravel. This is most evident in someone who is trying to maintain several fake Facebook accounts at once and eventually, they will drop the ball and mix up their stories.
If you start noticing this in response to questions, or in their comments, take note and remain alert for more inconsistencies.
Image titled Appreciate Authentic Death or Black Metal Step 512
Do a double take if the person says anything weird or "out-of-character". For example: if an adult is pretending to be a teen, they may say something that dates them by referring to a historic event or person that teens wouldn't really know much about. Or they may prove to know way too much about a topic that someone they're claiming to be would not.
Take note of what the suspicious person says, as everyone slips up! No one is perfect, and they're bound to eventually say something that will give you a hint that your hunch is correct.
Image titled Reveal a Fake Facebook Account Step 1313
Be really wary of undying declarations of love, affection, and romance. If someone you've never met, who lives thousands of miles away from you, and who has barely revealed themselves gets amorous with you, be suspicious. Sometimes the faker does this because they love the feeling of playing with the life and feelings of someone else; sometimes it's because they're in love with online love but are too afraid to reveal their true selves (or they're in a relationship in real life); and other times it could be that they're after something, like money, sex, or drugs.
Question your own feelings and motivations if you start to feel something for a person who declares they love you online. Is it too sudden? Too weird? Too freaky? A little bit icky? Trust those feelings and delete this fake friend from your account.
If they ask you for sexy pictures, immediately be suspicious. A fake account is a good shill for getting free pornographic material that then gets passed around online.
Image titled Reveal a Fake Facebook Account Step 1414
Unfriend them! If you're suspicious, unsure, or uncomfortable with having them as part of your Facebook friends, pull the plug. It's not like they're your real friends or family, and they could cause you a lot of future problems.
Warn other friends of yours on Facebook if you know they have also friended the fake account; one of the tactics of an impostor is to befriend others in your circle of friends to try to make the friendship seem more "real".


Is Facebook doing enough to stop the creation of fake Facebook accounts? Share your thoughts in the comments below!
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