ANIMAL PLANET'S DOCUMENTARY - MERMAIDS: THE BODY FOUND Part 4 out of 9



ANIMAL PLANET'S MERMAIDS: THE BODY FOUND PAINTS A WILDLY CONVINCING PICTURE OF THE EXISTENCE OF MERMAIDS, WHAT THEY MAY LOOK LIKE AND WHY THEY'VE STAYED HIDDEN...UNTIL NOW
While coastal flooding millions of years ago turned some of our ancestors inland, is it possible that one group of our ancestors didn't retreat from water but rather went in deeper? Could they have ventured farther into sea out of necessity and to find food? The Aquatic Ape Theory makes it possible to believe that while we evolved into terrestrial humans, our aquatic relatives turned into something strangely similar to the fabled mermaid. As evidence that humans once evolved into aquatic creatures, the Aquatic Ape Theory cites some of the striking differences between man and other primates and the many features we share with marine mammals, including the following:
Webbing between fingers (other primates don't have this)
Subcutaneous fat (insulating from cold water)
Control over breath (humans can hold breath up to 20 minutes, longer than any other terrestrial animal)
Loss of body hair (hair creates drag in water)
Instinctive ability to swim (human babies are able to do this)
A highly developed brain, which depends on nutrients provided by seafood
MERMAIDS: THE BODY FOUND makes a strong case for the existence of the mermaid, a creature with a surprisingly human evolutionary history, whose ancestral branch splits off from a shared human root. The film is science fiction, using science as a springboard into imagination and centering the story on the following real-world events:
In the early 1990s, the US Navy began a series of covert sonar tests, which were linked to mass die-offs of whales, which washed up on beaches throughout the world. For years, the Navy denied they were responsible for these beachings.
In 1997, scientists at the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recorded a mysterious sound (called "The Bloop") in the deep Pacific, which was thought to be organic in nature. It has never been identified.